The Good Food of Kuching, Part Three

*Continue from Part One and Two.

If you read about Kuching on WikiTravel, you will see they mentioned interesting about the drinks section. Notably famous drinks in Kuching would be the Teh C Special (3 Layers Tea) and White Lady. So, what is White Lady?

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White Lady – a concoction made of evaporated milk, syrup, colourful jellies and a slice of lemon. While the milk and syrup are sweet, the lemon lend a tangy taste to it, balancing the overall taste of the drink. All four of us love it on first sip!

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Pardon the flash, but our tables were quite far from any lighting source. Another local drink called Metahorn – made with syrup, cendol, grass jelly, crushed ice and slices of lemon and lime. Quite refreshing, it reminds me of our local leng chi kang.

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Of course we wouldn’t just be having drinks, so Danny ordered some char kuey teow and Mi Tomato (tomato kuey teow and yee mee) for us. It comes loaded with squid, pork, char siew and vegetables, all swimming in a reddish tomato-based gravy. It was quite delectable but I think the tomato gravy was a bit mild… as if it doesn’t taste like tomato at all.

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Hui Sing Hawker Centre,
Hui Sing Garden,
Stampin, Kuching

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But of course, other than Kolo mee, we can’t just leave Kuching without Sarawak Laksa. We went to Kit Siang Cafe (just slightly a stone throw away from Sin Lian Shin) the next morning for Danny’s favourite Sarawak Laksa haunt. Served with rice vermicelli, bean sprouts, chicken shreds, prawns and extra side dip, the soup was really good; flavourful but not too lemak and the spiciness level was tolerable. Must remember to squeeze in the lime juice for extra zing!

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Kit Siang Cafe
Jalan Green,
91350 Kuching, Sarawak.
(If Shin Lian Shin is on your left, drive further up along the same street and you will see it on your left)
See map of SLS here.

And that concludes our 3 days food trip on Kuching! Thanks to Danny for being such a gracious host! I’m planning to go back there again, anyone wanna tag along?

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The Good Food of Kuching, Part Two

*Continue from Part One.

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Eventhough Kuching is just two hours flight away from Kuala Lumpur, there are plenty of differences in the culture, people, environment and food between the two cities. For example, when our local friend Danny said he ordered “orr chien” (oyster omelette), little did we know that the oyster omelette in Kuching cooked without egg! (See picture above). So, this dish can’t be called oyster omelette-lah. Plenty of juicy oysters and chopped spring onions embedded onto the crispy deep fried cracker (made of flour) and sprinkle of alfalfa. Served with a diluted sauce made of white pepper, it’s a delicious snack to munch on to keep our tummies occupied before tea time.

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We let Danny take full control of the itinerary of the day and all the places he wanna bring us to. After spent few hours at the suburbs of Kuching, we’re back to the town and arrived at this small food court along Jalan Khoo Hun Yeang.

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Upon Danny’s recommendations, we tried the ais kacang, which came in petite bowls. And surprisingly, we found no kacang (beans) in it! Hahaha… anyway, the ais kacang was pretty standard and a good thirst quencher for a hot sunny day.

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Danny’s favourite dessert, “lek tau suan“. Made of mung beans – boiled till tender and powdery in texture and served warm with deep fried crullers (yau cha kuey), this dessert rarely can be found in Peninsular Malaysia. It is different from the usual red bean or mung bean porridge because of the texture; it doesn’t being cooked till mushy, but instead, still retain the shape. If you want to try making this, you can get the recipe here.

Aside from the two mentioned above, the steamed “siew mai” here is quite good too. But expect no yellowish skin, the siew mai here are pale in colour and contains no shrimp. Instead, minced fish paste and minced pork are used as filling.

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Food court at the open air market,
Jalan Khoo Hun Yeang,
93000 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

*Map’s location doesn’t show the exact location, but the place is somewhere along the street.

The Good Food of Kuching, Part One

When Kuching is mentioned, most foodie would associate it with Kolok mee and Sarawak laksa. In Malay, “Kuching” means “cat”, therefore Kuching is always being called as The City of Cats. Aside from the name, we found that the sky here is amazingly bright and blue, with interesting clouds formation hovering above.

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As this was our first time stepping on the Borneo land, we were lucky enough to have Danny to bring us around. He was kind enough to purposely fly back from Singapore to meet up with us and bring us to various places around Kuching and Santubong. But inside my mind, all I could think was just about food, food, and food. Honestly, I made a list of food that I wish to try out in Kuching, which includes:

  • Sarawak laksa
  • Kolo/kolok mee
  • Mi sapi
  • Manok pansoh (chicken cooked in bamboo)
  • Nasik aruk (oil-less fried rice)
  • Mi tomato

Out of the 6, I managed to try half of them. Quite an achievement-lah, right? ūüôā

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Behold, the legendary kolo mee of Sarawak! Unbeknownst to us, Danny brought us to one of the oldest place serving kolo mee in Kuching (I’ve verified this info with Scott, another Kuching-bred lad) on that beautiful Saturday morning for breakfast. We left the ordering task to him and without have to wait long, bowls of glorious kolo mee were presented before us. At first glance, it looked like plain instant noodle topped with minced pork, barbequed pork slices and chopped scallions. We gave it a good toss and then only realized the secret to a good kolo mee lies in the lardy oil and the seasoning used. The texture of the noodle was nice – thin with a slight bite. The barbequed pork slices however, are too dry for my liking but the texture of the noodle made up for it. Seriously, good stuff here.

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Another version of the kolo mee, added with barbequed pork marinade, hence the reddish hue of the noodle. I found this version is slightly sweeter than the original but still tastes good nonetheless.

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Danny initially ordered plain kuey teow for a vegetarian friend of us, but then we were surprised when this came. Same condiments used but the noodle was substituted with kuey teow. Although slippery smooth, it has a thicker texture compared to Ipoh’s version. The use of barbequed pork marinade gave the noodle a very interesting colour.

I’m missing the kolo mee badly already. ūüė¶

Sin Lian Shin
No. 182, Jalan Green,
91350 Kuching, Sarawak.
Phone: 082-240 726