CNY – What To Cook When There’s 20 Stomach To Feed?

We used to go to my grandmother’s house on Day 2 all these years. Even after her passing, we still practice the same thing. All mom’s brothers and sister (and their granddaughters) will gather at uncle’s house in Kuala Kangsar and whole house will be filled with kids laughters, chatting, gossips etc.

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We reached there around 2pm in the evening and lunch was ready. I briefly took some pictures as they’re hungry and started to attack the food but turned out blurred. So no picture on that. Instead, with so many stomach to feed, what should we cook? Answer, steamboat! Just look at the table!

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The boiling hot tom yam broth to cook the items. We cook with clear broth for the kids first, of course. 😛

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Shall let the pictures do the talking…

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My cousins’ daughters. Both on the right are the daughters of “my second uncle’s son’s” while the left one is my “third uncle’s son’s”. Goshdarnit, it sounds so complicated.

Alright, that’s for dinner. The next day, we went to do some prayer at temple and return back for late lunch.

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Simple hor fun with ikan bilis stock, some choy sum and fried shallots.

p.s: Sorry for the short post. Brain was not functioning well… 😛

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21 thoughts on “CNY – What To Cook When There’s 20 Stomach To Feed?

  1. Hehe. Short post okay. Big pictures ma.

    Very nice family-oriented entry. So warm, fuzzy feeling. Even better if I can get me some of that tom yam.

    O by the way, Happy Chap Goh Mei!! Time to throw them oranges into the sea to find your soulmate! Hehe.

  2. ooh…i spotted 2 red cans with a moon logo…are those abalones?? hehe…

    of all the dishes you featured up there, i prefer the hor fun…simple and nice…me weird, right? hehehe…

  3. i miss big family reunions..my dad has 15 siblings, bet you can imagine how big our gathering was. no one dares to cook, we’ll always go to restaurants. but now, there’s only a small group (some have migrated, passed on ) 😦

  4. Kenny: Happy Belated Chap Goh Mei! Haha, I thought throw oranges are for females? 😛

    Lyrical Lemongrass: Aha, that reminds me of Kin Kin Pan Mee!

    Yammylisious: Suitable for big scale gathering. 🙂

    Celine: Harlow there, welcome to WP.

    Nic: Your eyes are very sharp, yeah those were canned abalones. Heh, weirdo pakcik? 😛

    Precious Pea: Ehh.. don’t cry! We can go to restaurant for that, don’t cry!

    SC: Oh dear… so your family and relatives seldom get together to celebrate CNY now?

  5. wahahah look like steamboat buffet! hebat nye!
    i just have just now…makan puas puas because too lazy to eat breakfast and too busy for lunch…heh… aiks ur top disp pic is making me hungry :S my last time having toast was hari thaipusam ke-3 :S

    ur uncle’s son’s daughter mah ur niece lo…complicate?

  6. I missed my reunion dinner with my family this year. We too sometimes have a steamboat set up. So easy cos everyone just help themselves to what they want. I love it when everyone sweat together too! LOL!

  7. Christine: So you had your tom yam cravings fixed yet? 🙂

    Mama Bok: Me too!

    Vkeong: Yeah, Moon brand abalone.. heh.

    Jian: Oh yeah, I just can’t think of the word. 😛

    Wenching & Esiong: Quite easy to prepare actually… at least no need to stand in the kitchen.

    Teckiee: Yeah, it was fun.

    BBO: Only will do this once a year though.

    WMW: Yeah… CNY passed so fast.

    NKOTB: It was! 🙂

    Cumi & Ciki: Luckily, the spiciness was still bearable for us.

    Jun: Hi, don’t mention it ya. So you reach Australia already?

  8. Steamboat/hotpot is always a great idea when preparing food for large crowd and they’re always a crowd favorite. Everyone get to participate and you’re always sure of the freshness of the ingredients.
    I wonder why Japanese shabu shabu is not as popular back in Malaysia as it is with Asians and others alike in other countries. Of course, there’s the issue of getting good marbled beef slices in Malaysia, which is always difficult.
    It’s interesting to see how common hotpot is to every culture and yet done so differently from country to country.

    Still like the Szechuan ma-la hot pot best! 🙂

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