DU Project – Dim Sum Kitchen

Contrary to its name, Dim Sum Kitchen doesn’t have an extensive selection of dim sums. Ever popular with the working clientele, Dim Sum Kitchen dishes out reasonable Chinese “siu chow” dishes during lunch hour, with one or two special dish (only available for the particular day) rotating everyday. There is also a small stall selling economy rice if you’re in the rush.

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Special dish like the fried rice with siew yuk (roasted pork) is a hit with their loyal customers. I was told previously that this only available on Fridays, however, I think they rotated the menu as they served another item on Friday during my last visit. It would be best if you ask the waitress first. The siew yuk has a crackling, crispy skin while the rice is stir-fried with some dark sauce and bits of preserved vegetables.

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Other common items available includes Pork Chop Rice (RM 6, add egg RM 7), Yin Yeong (Fried kuay teow and rice vermicelli in egg gravy, RM 5.20), Assam Fish Fillet Rice (RM 5.70, comes with plenty of vegetables) and so on. We found the food presentation sometimes not consistent; for example, the pork chop rice sometimes comes with a slice of luncheon meat or baked beans and sometimes not. Taste wise, the pork chop is a bit too fatty for me. Yin Yeong and the assam fish were not bad and rather appetising.

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Dim Sum Kitchen,
85, Jalan SS 21/37,
Damansara Uptown, 47400 PJ.
(opposite open air car park)

Merdeka Open House 2010: Food From Our Hearts

Merdeka Open House event is back! Organized annually on the Malaysia independence month by our dear Babe KL, I took the effort to participate in this year’s event with the theme “Food From Our Hearts” (I didn’t participate last year due to time constraint).

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So, what does food from the heart means? As most people know, when it comes to cooking, we need skills, effort, ingredients, tools and also the “heart“. When cooking from the heart, the food would usually looked scrumptious and has a perfect balance of taste (saltiness, sweetness etc), smell and texture. Most of the time, mom’s cooking fulfilled every aspects as I mentioned above.

I’ve always admired my mom, as she could whip up an array of dishes easily and quickly. Her nasi lemak has been a favourite among my siblings and myself since we’re little, as well as her “ham kou” (rice cake with preserved vegetable and dried shrimp), which I’m going to write about for the Merdeka Open House event this year.

Rice Cake with Preserved Vegetable & Dried Shrimp

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Guesstimate recipe:

  1. 500 – 600 grams rice flour, sifted
  2. About 1 litre water, adjust to preference
  3. 400 grams preserved vegetables (dai tau choy or choy pou), minced
  4. 400 grams dried shrimp, coarsely chopped
  5. 10 rose shallots, finely chopped
  6. 20 red chillies
  7. some bird’s eyes chillies (cili padi) – if you like it spicier
  8. juice from 10 calamansi lime
  9. salt and sugar to taste

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How to do it:

  1. Mix the rice flour with water in a round metal deep dish (the upper part of the metal steamer). Adjust the flour and water amount to your peference; too much flour would yield harder cake and too much water would cause the cake mushy.
  2. Add some salt to the mixture and steam it high heat, stirring occasionally and gently to prevent the mixture for coagulating at the bottom part of the dish. Do this step until the bottom part started to set in. Cover and continue to steam over medium heat for about 30 – 40 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, fry the chopped preserved vegetable, shallots and dried shrimps separately and set aside. Reserve some of the oil as well.
  4. Blend the chillies till formed a smooth paste (alternatively, pound the chillies with a pestle and mortar for a coarse chilli sauce texture). In a heat-proof bowl/pan, heat the calamansi juice. Add the chilli paste to the juice and mix well. Add sugar to taste and remove from heat. Let the chilli sauce cool.
  5. When the cake is done (test this by poking a chopstick into the cake and if it comes out clean, it’s ready), set aside to cool. Spread the shallots, dried shrimps, oil and preserved vegetables on the cake before serving. Serve with home made chilli sauce.
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    Happy Birthday, Malaysia!

Shooting With Canon EOS 1000D – Eastern’s Brasserie, Ipoh

*Finally joined the league of DSLRs among the food bloggers. This is my first post, with all photos shot with Canon EOS 1000D. WB a bit off, especially on the white plates that turned blue… :(

It was a not-so-warm afternoon where Motormouth and I were driving around Ipoh, trying to look a place for lunch… Then he remembered a new place called Eastern’s Brasserie featured on the All About Ipoh Facebook page and he suggested that we go and have a look.

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This sparkling new restaurant occupied the corner lot of the previous Rendezvous Cafe at the junction in between Jalan Sultan Idris Shah (Brewster Street) and Jalan Dato’ Onn Jaafar (Cockman Street) and is part of Eastern Hotel’s refurbishment project. White dining tables and chairs dominate the overall dining area, with splashes of warm tone on the walls, while interesting marbled-effect flooring complements the whole picture.

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Their menu is utterly simple; appetizers, salads, soups, main courses, desserts and drinks were all chucked into a 3 pages menu, with prices ranged from RM8 – RM75 (the most expensive item would be the grilled lobster). Set lunches starts from RM24 that comes with a soup of the day, main course and drink.

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My Potage of Broccoli and Potato (RM8 a la carte) was thick, creamy and came in a generous portion, and could be easily shared by two person (which we did!).

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My choice proves to be a right one as the Grilled Chicken with Mushroom Ragout was a delight to the palate. The boneless chicken thigh was grilled to juicy-perfection, with every bites exudes a pleasant smoky, charred aroma, while the meat retains its juiciness with a tinge of fruity-sweetness. Served over a bed of mashed potato (?), some vegetables and mushroom ragout, the ragout doesn’t overpower the chicken but I doubt it was mashed potato as it tastes more like polenta to me.

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My dining companion chose to go light instead, with Cod Fillet with Mango (RM24). Although the portion seems a little bit too small for our dear Motormouth, he enjoyed the dish tremendously. The mango coulis lent a slightly sweetish aftertaste to the lightly charred cod fillet.

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We end our lunch on a sweet note by having the Poached Guava (RM10). A rare find for Ipoh standard; I found it ok while Motormouth prefers it if they would asked beforehand what type of ice cream flavour we wanted as chocolate ice cream does not exactly match the flavour of the dessert.

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Eastern’s Brasserie
118, Jalan Sultan Idris Shah,
30000 Ipoh, Perak.

Tel: 05-254 9847 / 012 – 471 9847 (KK Loke)
Business Hours: Monday – Saturday, 12pm – 2.30pm and 7pm – 10pm. Closed on Sundays.

p/s: Seems like blogger V!Nni3 has a different opinion on this place. Read about her experience here.